hat is known when he got 97 per cent of t

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. -- Tampa Bay offensive guard Carl Nicks expects to play in his first game in 10 months when the Buccaneers face the New England Patriots in an exhibition game Friday night. While Bucs coach Greg Schiano wouldnt commit to using Nicks, who is recovering from a left toe injury, the 2011 All-Pro said Thursday, "I think thats the plan now, unless something changes." Nicks last played Oct. 25 but took part in the three days of joint practices with the Patriots that ended with a walkthrough Thursday. Schiano thought Nicks would play but wanted to wait before making a final decision. "I just want to play it by ear, see how he feels," Schiano said. "Right now, it isnt what Im concerned with. Although I want to get him work if he can, Im not going to be overly cautious, but, at the same time, I dont want to be silly." Nicks played all 64 games with the New Orleans Saints after they drafted him in the fifth round out of Nebraska in 2009. But he was limited to seven games last year with Tampa Bay. Nicks said he wasnt nervous about coming back. "If I was a rookie or maybe a second-year guy, maybe," he said, "but its just another day at the office." And, he said, hes "as confident as I can be. This kind of injury, I dont know many people have it. (Im) as confident as (I can be with) the information Ive been told." Schiano said hes still deciding how many plays his first team offence and defence will get against the Patriots. Theres a chance the Bucs will be facing Tom Brady, an unlikely prospect when the Patriots quarterback left Wednesdays practice with a sprained left knee. But on Thursday, Brady took all the snaps with the first-team offence and played without a limp. He was hurt when defensive end Adrian Clayborn rushed left tackle Nate Solder, who fell back into Brady, forcing the quarterback to the ground where he clutched his knee. "Its just unfortunate," Schiano said. "You talk all the time about letting them throw and the bull-rush stuff, but Im glad hes OK and its one of the dangers. You keep warning (players), but its hard, especially when they get competing with each other. So its part of the deal. Weve just got to try to prevent it, if at all possible." Did Clayborn do anything wrong in charging hard? "I just think everybodys playing football," Schiano said. "Im not going to get into right or wrong. Its an inherent risk with what we do. We try to be really smart with it. They try to be really smart with it. It was just a great three days of work. You cant get this against yourself. So Im really pleased." Luke Kunin Jersey . -- Louisville backup quarterback Reggie Bonnafon ran for two touchdowns and passed for another and the No. Chris Stewart Jersey . Gonzalez participated in his final game on Sunday, Atlantas 21-20 defeat at the hands of the NFC South champion Carolina Panthers, having posted four catches for 46 yards. http://www.hockeywildauthority.com/deva ... rsey-c-20/. As their best player continued to orchestrate his dramatic exit from the club, the Whitecaps added size and creativity at Thursdays Major League Soccer SuperDraft. Marcus Foligno Jersey .J. -- The New York Jets have promoted Tony Sparano Jr. Charlie Coyle Jersey . Case in point: LeBron James vs. Ben McLemore. James was driving to the rim in the first quarter and McLemore decided to try to take the charge, which was quite admirable and predictably futile.SAN DIEGO -- Tony Gwynns sweet swing was matched only by his incandescent smile. The Hall of Famer was saluted at Petco Park on Thursday night in a ceremony that would have made "Mr. Padre" light up. Though, that wasnt something Gwynn had trouble doing. "It was so engaging," former teammate Steve Garvey said of Gwynns grin. "There are a few guys in sports that have it. You always think of Magic (Johnson), and Tony was baseballs Magic as far as that smile was concerned." Gwynn, a Hall of Famer who spent his entire 20-year career with the Padres, died on June 16 from oral cancer, a disease he attributed to years of chewing tobacco. He was 54. The 15-time All Star averaged .338 over a career in which he had 3,141 hits and won eight NL batting titles. A two-sport star at San Diego State before getting selected by the Padres in the third round of the 1981 draft, he was beloved for his achievements on the field and his humility on and off it. Gwynn never hid his affection for San Diego, embracing his "Mr. Padre" nickname and declining to leave San Diego as a free agent on numerous occasions. After retiring from the Padres following the 2001 season, Gwynn became SDSUs baseball coach. Hall of Famer Reggie Jackson and ex-Padre Trevor Hoffman were among the speakers who addressed the crowd of about 20,000 from a stage erected in right field, just in front of the No. 19 carved into the outfield grass. A podium was placed between three No. 19 Gwynn jerseys, two from the Padres World Series appearances in 1984 and 1998 and one from San Diego State. The left-field scoreboard showed a collage of pictures that ranged from Gwynn tipping his hat to the crowd and to him clutching his Hall of Fame plaque. And, of course, one displaying that warm smile. "We all know Tony was a great player, a great Hall of Famer," Jackson said. "That is known when he got 97 per cent of the vote -- that puts him in the top four or five. ... "He was a genuine man, a quality man, a 100 per cent family man. A great son, a great husband, a great father, a great friend and a great teammate. He was an example of whhat we all want to live and emulate as a person.dddddddddddd" Thursdays tribute, which started when 19 white doves were released, was open to the public following the private service Gwynns family held Saturday at SDSU. Gwynns fans, many wearing his brown-and-yellow No. 19 jersey, were given a chance to pay their respects to someone they felt they knew. He was an anchor of not only the Padres two World Series teams, but in the community as well. After leaving the Padres, he coached at SDSU, was a member of the Padres broadcasting team and remained active in various charities. A stream of people walked past Gwynns statue in the adjacent Park at the Park, with a line snaking past memorabilia of his storied career. Gwynn, whose No. 19 is retired by the Padres, batted at least .300 in 19 straight seasons. In 1994, he was hitting .394 in August when the season ended prematurely because of the baseball strike; in 1995, he struck out only 15 times in 577 plate appearances. But it was the way Gwynn carried himself that endeared him to countless fans. And not just those in San Diego. Gwynn has been honoured around baseball since his death. Tony Gwynn Jr., his son, was given a standing ovation Tuesday in Philadelphia in his first at-bat with the Phillies since taking a leave following his fathers death. "Even though he was on the other team you still had to admire the way he went about his business," said Joe Torre, an executive vice-president for Major League Baseball and former Yankees manager. "Unfortunately we dont have many, maybe any -- maybe Derek Jeter -- that conduct themselves in a similar fashion. "Honestly, what you saw is what you got: he was a good hitter and never tried to show anybody up." Gwynn became and stayed a star in San Diego. He never thought it would shine brighter elsewhere. "Im a Padre, a San Diego Padre," Gwynn once said. "And Im proud of it." Near the end of the tribute Hoffman, in a halting voice, talked straight to Gwynn, his former Padres teammate. "Thank you for representing San Diego," Hoffman said, "with such class." Cheap NFL Jerseys Wholesale Jerseys Wholesale NFL Jerseys Jerseys From China Wholesale NFL Jerseys Cheap NFL Jerseys Cheap Jerseys ' ' '

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